Dream Come True

Reader's Dream Come True

 

All-Time Favorites

FICTION:

1.     The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen

2.     White Noise, by Don DeLillo

3.     Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky

4.     Slaughterhouse Five, by Kurt Vonnegut

5.     Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

 

NON-FICTION:

1.     Mere Christianity, by C.S. Lewis

2.     From Beirut to Jerusalem, by Thomas L. Friedman

3.     In Cold Blood, by Truman Capote

4.     Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer

5.     The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

 

PLAYWRITING (from an admittedly inextensive number of readings on my part):

1.     Glengarry Glen Ross, by David Mamet

2.     Who’s Afraid of Virginia Wolfe? by Edward Albee

3.     Othello, by William Shakespeare

4.     Dr. Faustus, by Christohper Marlowe

5.     Waiting For Godot, by Samuel Becket

 

2010 Reading List:

  1. The Book of Exodus: by Moses, from The Bible (01.15.2010)
  2. Infinite Jest, by David Foster Wallace (02.27.2010) – ****
  3. ROMANCE, by David Mamet (03.04.05) – *1/2
  4. Speed the Plow, by David Mamet (03.09.2010) – ***1/2
  5. The Beauty Queen of Leenane, by Martin McDonagh (March 2010) – ****
  6. A Skull in Connemera, by Martin McDonagh – (April 2010) – ***
  7. The Living Church: Convictions of a Lifelong Pastor, by John Stott  (04.15.2010) – **
  8. The Book of Hosea: by Hosea, from The Bible (5.17.2010)
  9. The Book of Joel: by Joel, from The Bible (5.20.2010)
  10. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, by J.K. Rowling (05.29.2010) – ****
  11. The Lonesome West, by Martin McDonagh (06.05.2010) – ***1/2
  12. August: Osage County, by Tracy Letts (06.23.2010) – **
  13. The Book of Leviticus, from The Bible (09.??.2010)
  14. Strong Motion, by Jonathan Franzen (08.??.10) – ***1/2
  15. The Corrections, by Jonathan Franzen (09.27.2010) – ****
  16. The Book of Numbers, from The Bible (10.21.2010)
  17. Freedom, by Jonathan Franzen (10.24.2010) – ****
  18. Freakonomics, by Steven D Levitt and Stephen J Dubner (11.07.2010) – **
  19. Batman: HUSH, by Jeff Loeb, Jim Lee and Scott Williams (11.15.2010) – ***
  20. The Book of 1 Samuel, from The Bible (11.22.2010)
  21. Fantastic Four: Heroes Reborn, by Jim Lee (12.08.2010) – ***
  22. The Gospel of Matthew, from The Bible (12.09.2010)
  23. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, by Michael Chabon (12.15.2010) – ****
  24. Franny and Zooey, by J.D. Salinger (12.25.2010) – ****
  25. Armageddon in Retrospect, by Kurt Vonnegut (12.31.2010) – ***1/2

2009 Reading List:

  1. Twilight, by Stephanie Meyer (01.??.09) – **
  2. Outliers: The Story of Success, by Malcolm Gladwell (02.01.09) – ***
  3. (AUDIOBOOK) Riding the Bullet, a short story by Stephen King (02.07.09) – **
  4. (AUDIOBOOK) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, by Philip K. Dick (02.14.09) – ****
  5. Watchmen, by Alan Moore (02.22.09) – ***
  6. The Twenty-Seventh City, by Jonathan Franzen (4.20.09) – ****
  7. About 1/2 of IV – A Decade of Curious People and Dangerous Ideas, by Chuck Klosterman – ***
  8. About 1/2 of Creationists: Selected Essays, by E.L. Doctorow – ***
  9. Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior, by Ori Brafman and Rom Brafman – (05.12.09) – **
  10. Purple America, by Rick Moody (06.05.09) – ***
  11. The Making of the New Testament, by Arthur G. Patzia (07.09.09) ****
  12. The Road, by Cormac McCarthy (07.18.09) – ***1/2
  13. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, by J.K. Rowling (09.01.09) – ****
  14. Preacher: The Complete Series, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon (10.6.09) – ***
  15. The Gospel of John, from The Bible
  16. The Book of Acts, from The Bible
  17. The Book of Romans, from The Bible
  18. Bird By Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life, by Anne Lamott (12.01.09) – ****
  19. The Book of Ecclesiastes, by Solomon, from The Bible
  20. Me Talk Pretty One Day, by David Sedaris (12.28.09) – **
  21. Batman: The Killing Joke, by Alan Moore and Brian Bolland (12.29.09) – ****

 

2008 Reading List:

  1. I Am Legend, by Richard Matheson – ***
  2. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, by Jean-Dominique Bauby – ***1/2
  3. The Virgin Suicides, by Jeffrey Eugenides – ****
  4. The Metamorphosis, by Franz Kafka – ****
  5. The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James – ***1/2
  6. The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference, by Malcolm Gladwell – ***1/2
  7. Fortune and Glory: A True Hollywood Comic Book Story, by Brian Michael Bendis – ***1/2
  8. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by J.K Rowling – ***
  9. The Lieutenant of Inishmore, by Martin McDonogh – ****
  10. Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte  – ****
  11. A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess – ****
  12. Preacher: Gone to Texas, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon – ***1/2
  13. The Pillowman, by Martin McDonagh  – ****
  14. American Psycho, by Bret Easton Ellis  – ***
  15. Into the Wild, by Jon Krakauer  – ****
  16. The Areas of My Expertise, by John Hodgman  – ***
  17. The Martian Chronicles, by Ray Bradbury  – ****
  18. Preacher: Until the End of the World, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon  – ***1/2
  19. Breakfast of Champions; OR Goodbye, Blue Monday, by Kurt Vonnegut – ***1/2
  20. Preacher: Proud American, by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon – ***
  21. About 100 pages of The Complete Polysyllabic Spree, by Nick Hornby – **
  22. About 65 pages of Lost in Transmission: What We Can Know About the Words of Jesus, by Nicholas Perrin – **1/2

Other Favorites – Coming Soon

2 Responses to “Literature”


  1. 1 may7black October 23, 2009 at 3:30 am

    A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess is a good book (the movie by Stanley Kubrick was equally good).

    I presented a comparison between the two in my translation course.
    the basic concept that i was dealing with was that Burgess effectively uses translation as a process of meaning making. a word like “groovy” or “tolchok” would mean absolutely nothing (probably) outside the book/movie. but burgess creates the meaning with the context.

    (n.b it’s quite funny but Burgess also proves the theory of the 6th century Indian philosopher Bhartriyahari true. He said the world is a linguistic contruct. (which was later picked up by the french theorist) meaning that the word come first and then the meaning. everything in the world is a manifestation of THE word.

    ———————-
    liked going through your blog.

    • 2 Jason October 23, 2009 at 4:28 am

      That is a very interesting theory. I think David Foster Wallace picked up on it in “The Broom of the System.” A word IS and acquires meaning(s) after that point, based on what (actions, feelings, ideas, etc) we attribute it (the word) to. The logic can get a bit circular and some might argue that the most important things in life can’t be defined or put into words; or that words only hint at the actual and/or full meaning, but then we come around again and ask if we would even know that much if it weren’t for words explaining that. If nothing else, it’s fun to talk about with people. I like your use of the notion in relation to Burgess as well. Nicely done.


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